Skip to content

An installation of Huma Bhabha’s new terracotta sculptures now on view at the Fundación Casa Wabi in Puerto Escondido, Oaxaca, Mexico is the subject of this Online Viewing Room, which features a text by exhibition curator and Public Art Fund Artistic & Executive Director Nicholas Baume. In these haunting works, Bhabha explores the potentials of locally sourced materials while furthering her ongoing investigations of the human—and humanoid—form. As Baume points out, the sculptures spring from multiple art historical and cultural lineages. Their impact is equally diverse. They evoke stillness and mystery, violence, and familiarity, and an unlikely sense of knowingness that, despite their fragmentary nature, makes it feel as though they behold their viewers as much as their viewers behold them. The exhibition at Casa Wabi is on view through December 31, 2022.

If you are interested in purchasing the featured works or inquiring about additional works by Huma Bhabha, please click "INQUIRE" below to email our team. 

To subscribe to our mailing list, please click here.

Touching Earth | Tocando la Tierra

Nicholas Baume
Casa Wabi, February 2022

Huma Bhabha’s new body of work was made during a three-week residency at Casa Wabi in early 2022. She traveled from Poughkeepsie, a small city on the Hudson River north of New York City, trading winter for a sojourn on the Oaxacan coast. Alongside a group of fellow artists in residence—each making work in their own studios, sharing meals and the experience of this unique meeting of landscape, culture, and Tadao Ando’s architecture—Bhabha has experimented with local materials and traditional methods to create an installation that brings her own distinctive aesthetic into dialogue with this remarkable place.

El nuevo conjunto de obras de Huma Bhabha fue creado durante una residencia de tres semanas en Casa Wabi a principios de 2022. La artista viajó desde Poughkeepsie, una pequeña ciudad a orillas del río Hudson al norte de la ciudad de Nueva York, dejando atrás el riguroso clima invernal por una breve estancia en la costa oaxaqueña. Junto a un grupo de colegas en residencia —cada uno trabajando en sus creaciones en sus propios estudios, compartiendo comidas y la experiencia de este encuentro único de paisaje, cultura y la arquitectura de Tadao Ando— Bhabha ha experimentado con métodos tradicionales y materiales locales para crear una instalación que pone su inconfundible estética en diálogo con este fascinante lugar.

Text-Image

Huma Bhabha, February 12 – December 31, 2022, Fundación Casa Wabi, Puerto Escondido, Oaxaca, Mexico, Installation view

Huma Bhabha, February 12 – December 31, 2022, Fundación Casa Wabi, Puerto Escondido, Oaxaca, Mexico, Installation view

Huma Bhabha, February 12 – December 31, 2022, Fundación Casa Wabi, Puerto Escondido, Oaxaca, Mexico, Installation view

Huma Bhabha, February 12 – December 31, 2022, Fundación Casa Wabi, Puerto Escondido, Oaxaca, Mexico, Installation view

Huma Bhabha, February 12 – December 31, 2022, Fundación Casa Wabi, Puerto Escondido, Oaxaca, Mexico, Installation view

Huma Bhabha, February 12 – December 31, 2022, Fundación Casa Wabi, Puerto Escondido, Oaxaca, Mexico, Installation view

Huma Bhabha, February 12 – December 31, 2022, Fundación Casa Wabi, Puerto Escondido, Oaxaca, Mexico, Installation view

Huma Bhabha, February 12 – December 31, 2022, Fundación Casa Wabi, Puerto Escondido, Oaxaca, Mexico, Installation view

Huma Bhabha, February 12 – December 31, 2022, Fundación Casa Wabi, Puerto Escondido, Oaxaca, Mexico, Installation view

Huma Bhabha, February 12 – December 31, 2022, Fundación Casa Wabi, Puerto Escondido, Oaxaca, Mexico, Installation view

Huma Bhabha, February 12 – December 31, 2022, Fundación Casa Wabi, Puerto Escondido, Oaxaca, Mexico, Installation view

Huma Bhabha, February 12 – December 31, 2022, Fundación Casa Wabi, Puerto Escondido, Oaxaca, Mexico, Installation view

Huma Bhabha, February 12 – December 31, 2022, Fundación Casa Wabi, Puerto Escondido, Oaxaca, Mexico, Installation view

Huma Bhabha, February 12 – December 31, 2022, Fundación Casa Wabi, Puerto Escondido, Oaxaca, Mexico, Installation view

Huma Bhabha, February 12 – December 31, 2022, Fundación Casa Wabi, Puerto Escondido, Oaxaca, Mexico, Installation view

Huma Bhabha, February 12 – December 31, 2022, Fundación Casa Wabi, Puerto Escondido, Oaxaca, Mexico, Installation view

Huma Bhabha, February 12 – December 31, 2022, Fundación Casa Wabi, Puerto Escondido, Oaxaca, Mexico, Installation view

Huma Bhabha, February 12 – December 31, 2022, Fundación Casa Wabi, Puerto Escondido, Oaxaca, Mexico, Installation view

Huma Bhabha, February 12 – December 31, 2022, Fundación Casa Wabi, Puerto Escondido, Oaxaca, Mexico, Installation view

Huma Bhabha, February 12 – December 31, 2022, Fundación Casa Wabi, Puerto Escondido, Oaxaca, Mexico, Installation view

Huma Bhabha, February 12 – December 31, 2022, Fundación Casa Wabi, Puerto Escondido, Oaxaca, Mexico, Installation view

Huma Bhabha, February 12 – December 31, 2022, Fundación Casa Wabi, Puerto Escondido, Oaxaca, Mexico, Installation view

Huma Bhabha, February 12 – December 31, 2022, Fundación Casa Wabi, Puerto Escondido, Oaxaca, Mexico, Installation view

Huma Bhabha, February 12 – December 31, 2022, Fundación Casa Wabi, Puerto Escondido, Oaxaca, Mexico, Installation view

Huma Bhabha, February 12 – December 31, 2022, Fundación Casa Wabi, Puerto Escondido, Oaxaca, Mexico, Installation view

Huma Bhabha, February 12 – December 31, 2022, Fundación Casa Wabi, Puerto Escondido, Oaxaca, Mexico, Installation view

Huma Bhabha, February 12 – December 31, 2022, Fundación Casa Wabi, Puerto Escondido, Oaxaca, Mexico, Installation view

Huma Bhabha, February 12 – December 31, 2022, Fundación Casa Wabi, Puerto Escondido, Oaxaca, Mexico, Installation view

Huma Bhabha, February 12 – December 31, 2022, Fundación Casa Wabi, Puerto Escondido, Oaxaca, Mexico, Installation view

Huma Bhabha, February 12 – December 31, 2022, Fundación Casa Wabi, Puerto Escondido, Oaxaca, Mexico, Installation view

Huma Bhabha, February 12 – December 31, 2022, Fundación Casa Wabi, Puerto Escondido, Oaxaca, Mexico, Installation view

Huma Bhabha, February 12 – December 31, 2022, Fundación Casa Wabi, Puerto Escondido, Oaxaca, Mexico, Installation view

Huma Bhabha, The Orientalist, 2007, cast bronze, 70 x 41 x 33 inches (177.8 x 104.1 x 83.8 cm), Edition of 3
 

Installation view, Statuesque, Public Art Fund exhibition at City Hall Park, New York

Huma Bhabha, The Orientalist, 2007, cast bronze, 70 x 41 x 33 inches (177.8 x 104.1 x 83.8 cm), Edition of 3
 

Installation view, Statuesque, Public Art Fund exhibition at City Hall Park, New York


When invited to propose an artist for Casa Wabi, I immediately thought of Bhabha. Our first curatorial encounter was in 2010, when I included her work in Statuesque, a Public Art Fund exhibition at City Hall Park in New York City. It considered the ways in which an international group of artists had renewed interest in sculptural figuration. In what was her first public art installation, she showed The Orientalist (2007), a work that highlighted her often improvisatory artistic language, as well as her eclectic interests in art history, popular culture and mythic forms. That experience, combined with the rich body of work she has produced over the last decade, suggested to me that time spent at Casa Wabi might prove inspiring.

Cuando me invitaron a proponer a un artista para Casa Wabi, inmediatamente pensé en Bhabha. Nuestro primer encuentro curatorial fue en 2010, cuando incluí sus obras en Statuesque, una exposición del Public Art Fund en el City Hall Park de la ciudad de Nueva York, que destacaba las formas en que un grupo de artistas internacionales había renovado el interés en la escultura figurativa. Allí, la artista exhibió The Orientalist (2007), su primera instalación de arte público, una obra que destacaba su lenguaje artístico a menudo improvisado, así como sus intereses eclécticos en la historia del arte, la cultura popular y las formas míticas. Esa experiencia y el rico conjunto de obras que Bhabha ha creado a lo largo de los últimos diez años me sugirieron que un tiempo en Casa Wabi podría resultarle inspirador.

Text-Image

Huma Bhabha
Huma Bhabha
Huma Bhabha
Huma Bhabha
Huma Bhabha
Huma Bhabha
Huma Bhabha
Huma Bhabha

Huma Bhabha

Untitled, 2022

terracotta, acrylic, sand, plywood, and concrete

overall dimensions:

47 1/4 x 24 1/2 x 24 1/2 inches

(120 x 62.2 x 62.2 cm)

Inquire

Text-Image

Huma Bhabha
Huma Bhabha
Huma Bhabha
Huma Bhabha
Huma Bhabha
Huma Bhabha
Huma Bhabha
Huma Bhabha

Huma Bhabha

Untitled, 2022

terracotta, acrylic, sand, plywood, and concrete

overall dimensions:

15 3/4 x 32 1/4 x 32 1/4 inches

(40 x 81.9 x 81.9 cm)

Inquire

Text-Image

Huma Bhabha
Huma Bhabha
Huma Bhabha
Huma Bhabha
Huma Bhabha
Huma Bhabha
Huma Bhabha
Huma Bhabha
Huma Bhabha
Huma Bhabha
Huma Bhabha

Huma Bhabha

Untitled, 2022

terracotta, acrylic, sand, plywood, and concrete

overall dimensions:

53 1/8 x 24 1/2 x 24 1/2 inches

(134.9 x 62.2 x 62.2 cm)

Inquire

Bhabha quickly felt a sense of connection to the place. She grew up in Karachi, Pakistan, close to the beach on the Arabian Sea. She found parallels in a Mexican landscape at once demanding and nourishing, one with hardy vegetation resilient enough to thrive in salt air and intense sun, and a local cuisine of strong flavors with spice and heat, brightness and crunch. Such rhymes help to organize a traveler’s experiences of places on different sides of the globe.

Bhabha sintió una conexión inmediata con el lugar, tras haber crecido en Karachi, Pakistán, cerca de la playa del Mar Arábigo. La artista encontró paralelismos en un paisaje mexicano que es a la vez desafiante y estimulante, con una vegetación suficientemente resiliente para prosperar en el aire salado y el sol intenso, y una gastronomía local con sabores fuertes y crujientes llenos de especias, picantes y colores vibrantes. Tales rimas ayudan a organizar las experiencias del viajero en distintas puntas del planeta.

Into this landscape Ando’s elemental forms inscribe a powerful presence. His use of the palapa recognizes and refines the local vernacular. At the same time, his monumental axial plan, vast dividing wall, and series of concrete structures remind me of the imposing geometries of Ancient Egypt—think of the mortuary temple of Hatshepsut, dramatically set into its mountain landscape. There’s also something tomb-like about the design of the Casa Wabi gallery. The space, reached through an enormous, heavy sliding metal door, is set below the grade of the entrance. One can descend from a landing into the cool, rectangular concrete room by way of a long ramp that divides the space or a set of wall-to-wall steps. As one moves further into the space, the mortuary analogy dissipates as a set of large windows opens onto the mountain landscape beyond. This tomb comes with a view.  

Las formas elementales de Ando inscriben una poderosa presencia en este paisaje. Su uso de la palapa reconoce y refina la arquitectura típica del lugar. Al mismo tiempo, su monumental planta axial, el inmenso muro divisorio y su serie de estructuras de concreto me recuerdan las imponentes geometrías del Antiguo Egipto —pensando en el templo mortuorio de Hatshepsut, dramáticamente ubicado en el paisaje montañoso del lugar. Además, el diseño de la galería de Casa Wabi tiene cierto parecido con una tumba. El espacio, al que se llega pasando por una enorme y pesada puerta corrediza de metal, se encuentra en un nivel inferior al de la entrada. Se puede descender a la sala rectangular de concreto, desde un descanso, atravesando una extensa rampa que divide el espacio o bajando una serie de escalones que se extienden de pared a pared. En esta sala, la analogía mortuoria se disipa por un conjunto de enormes ventanas que dan al paisaje montañoso del lugar. Una tumba con vista. 

 

Text-Image

Huma Bhabha, February 12 – December 31, 2022, Fundación Casa Wabi, Puerto Escondido, Oaxaca, Mexico, Installation view

Huma Bhabha, February 12 – December 31, 2022, Fundación Casa Wabi, Puerto Escondido, Oaxaca, Mexico, Installation view

The Egyptian reference also resonates because of its ongoing relevance as a source of iconography in Bhabha’s own work, which includes figures that resemble regally seated Pharaohs and deities with animal attributes. More often than not, Ancient Egyptian art and architecture relate in some way to the subject of death; Bhabha’s sculptures do too. That much is instantly clear in the Casa Wabi installation, in which an array of distressed and exploded body parts is assembled on a series of plinths, perhaps suggesting corpses from an archaeological dig on an alien planet. These dismembered figures comprise an otherworldly cast of characters: giants, humanoids, extraterrestrials—not us, but close enough to stir recognition.

La referencia egipcia también surge por su continua relevancia como fuente de iconografía en la obra de Bhabha, con figuras que se asemejan a faraones majestuosamente sentados y deidades con atributos animales.  La mayoría de las veces, el arte y la arquitectura del Antiguo Egipto se relacionan de alguna manera con el tema de la muerte, al igual que las esculturas de Bhabha. Y esto se hace claramente evidente en la instalación de Casa Wabi, en la que una serie de partes del cuerpo desgastadas y explotadas aparecen ensambladas en una especie de pedestales, tal vez sugiriendo cadáveres de una excavación arqueológica en un planeta alienígena. Estas figuras desmembradas comprenden un elenco de personajes de otro mundo: gigantes, humanoides, extraterrestres —no pertenecientes a la raza humana, pero con rasgos suficientes para despertar el reconocimiento.

Text-Image

Huma Bhabha
Huma Bhabha
Huma Bhabha
Huma Bhabha
Huma Bhabha
Huma Bhabha
Huma Bhabha
Huma Bhabha

Huma Bhabha

Untitled, 2022

terracotta, acrylic, sand, plywood, and concrete

overall dimensions:

13 3/8 x 59 7/8 x 32 1/4 inches

(34 x 152.1 x 81.9 cm)

Inquire

Text-Image

Huma Bhabha
Huma Bhabha
Huma Bhabha
Huma Bhabha
Huma Bhabha
Huma Bhabha
Huma Bhabha
Huma Bhabha

Huma Bhabha

Untitled, 2022

terracotta, acrylic, sand, plywood, and concrete

overall dimensions:

40 1/8 x 44 x 44 inches

(101.9 x 111.8 x 111.8 cm)

Inquire

Text-Image

Huma Bhabha
Huma Bhabha
Huma Bhabha
Huma Bhabha
Huma Bhabha
Huma Bhabha
Huma Bhabha

Huma Bhabha

Untitled, 2022

terracotta, acrylic, sand, plywood, and concrete

overall dimensions:

17 3/4 x 32 1/4 x 32 1/4 inches

(45.1 x 81.9 x 81.9 cm)

Inquire

The appeal of Bhabha’s work, however, offers contrasts with the beauty of Egyptian art, which provides serenely entombed assurances that the elite will enter a gilded afterlife. Her figures show signs of torment. Is this one gasping for air? Was that one blown to smithereens? Lacerated, scarred, mutilated in battle? Yet the emotions of her figures remain mysterious. Otherness renders their feelings inscrutable. Are they hideously disfigured or, to paraphrase Lady Gaga, were they born this way? To my mind that ambiguity is one reason why, despite the pervasive perfume and imagery of death, the installation doesn’t feel morbid.

El atractivo de la obra de Bhabha, sin embargo, contrasta con la belleza del arte egipcio, con garantías serenamente sepultadas que simbolizan la promesa de una vida dorada después de la muerte para la élite.   Las figuras de Bhabha muestran signos de tormento. ¿Este de aquí está jadeando por aire? ¿Aquel explotó en añicos? ¿Este otro fue lacerado, herido, mutilado en una batalla? Aun así, las emociones de sus figuras son todo un misterio. Su alteridad hace que sus sentimientos sean inescrutables. ¿Están espantosamente desfigurados o nacieron así? En mi opinión, esta ambigüedad es una de las razones por las que, a pesar del perfume y las imágenes omnipresentes de la muerte, la instalación no se siente morbosa.

Text-Image

Huma Bhabha
Huma Bhabha
Huma Bhabha
Huma Bhabha
Huma Bhabha
Huma Bhabha
Huma Bhabha
Huma Bhabha

Huma Bhabha

Untitled, 2022

terracotta, acrylic, sand, plywood, and concrete

overall dimensions:

18 1/8 x 48 x 95 5/8 inches

(46 x 121.9 x 242.9 cm)

Inquire

Joseph Beuys
Jungfrau (Virgin), 1961
teak wood
dimensions variable

Joseph Beuys
Jungfrau (Virgin), 1961
teak wood
dimensions variable

Joseph Beuys, who similarly imbued his work with a sense of the mythic, is another important influence for Bhabha. His Virgin (1961)—an abstracted figure constructed from separate blocks of teak wood assembled on the ground with legs splayed—provides a specific reference for her fragmented installation. Virgin has been compared with the colossal fallen Atlas figures at the Temple of Jupiter in Agrigento (after 480 B.C.), a site Bhabha has visited and also draws upon in this work. Mexican viewers might find their own resonances in Mesoamerican cultures, forms of which continue to endure today.

Atlas figure, c. 480 BC, at the Temple of Olympian Zeus (Jupiter), Valley of the Temples, Agrigento, Sicily 

Atlas figure, c. 480 BC, at the Temple of Olympian Zeus (Jupiter), Valley of the Temples, Agrigento, Sicily 

Joseph Beuys, quien de manera similar impregnó su obra con un sentido de lo mítico, es otra influencia importante para Bhabha. Su obra Virgin (1961), una figura abstracta construida a partir de bloques separados de madera de teca ensamblados en el suelo con las piernas extendidas, constituye una referencia específica de su instalación fragmentada. Virgin ha sido comparada con las colosales figuras caídas de Atlas en el Templo de Júpiter en Agrigento (después del 480 a.C.), un sitio que Bhabha ha visitado y en el que también se basa en este trabajo. Los espectadores mexicanos podrían encontrar sus propias resonancias en las culturas Mesoamericanas, cuyas formas aún perduran hoy en día.   

 

Text-Image

Huma Bhabha
Huma Bhabha
Huma Bhabha
Huma Bhabha
Huma Bhabha
Huma Bhabha
Huma Bhabha

Huma Bhabha

Untitled, 2022

terracotta, acrylic, sand, plywood, and concrete

overall dimensions:

18 7/8 x 40 1/8 x 40 1/8 inches

(47.9 x 101.9 x 101.9 cm)

Inquire

Bhabha’s corporeal fragments are laid out on cast concrete plinths, some low to the ground, others elevated, creating a sense of topography and interrelated parts. Designed to fit seamlessly into Ando’s architecture, their natural concrete surfaces draw out the sculptures’ varied terracotta hues. Their compound solidity contrasts with the sculptures’ ossified fragility. At the same time, the exploded vulnerability of the objects creates a tension with our sense of their occult power.

Los fragmentos corporales de Bhabha están dispuestos sobre pedestales de concreto, algunos casi al nivel del suelo, otros más elevados, creando una sensación de topografía y partes interrelacionadas. Diseñadas para encajar perfectamente en la arquitectura de Ando, sus superficies de concreto natural resaltan los variados tonos de terracota de las esculturas. Su solidez contrasta con la fragilidad osificada de las esculturas. Al mismo tiempo, la vulnerabilidad explotada de los objetos crea una tensión entre su poder oculto y nuestros sentidos.

Text-Image

Huma Bhabha
Huma Bhabha
Huma Bhabha
Huma Bhabha
Huma Bhabha

Huma Bhabha

Untitled, 2022

terracotta, acrylic, sand, plywood, and concrete

overall dimensions:

13 x 59 7/8 x 32 1/4 inches

(33 x 152.1 x 81.9 cm)

Inquire

Bhabha’s dance between the activation and suspension of our human identification allows us to take pleasure in the sculptures’ viscerally charged state, and in the sci-fi and pop culture references that often inflect her work alongside the ancient ones. Holding this tension is a strong sense of Bhabha’s hand: the molding, shaping, pinching, and scraping by which she made the objects is reflected in the many traces of physical manipulation that mark their surfaces. A material typically for making bricks, the local Oaxacan clay she used is dense with sand and sediment. These mineral compounds change under firing to produce something both raw and sophisticated. The colors shift from burnt umber to dusty pink while surface textures range from coarse sandpaper to dissolving sea salt. These unglazed works were fired in a traditional pit kiln behind the beach, heated by slow burning wood and coconut for up to twelve hours. The uneven heat distribution produced different effects from one work to the next, but all of them are imbued with a feeling of connection to the earth. We sense the transformation of organic material: once pliable clay rigidly set in eternal rest.  

La danza de Bhabha entre la activación y la suspensión de nuestra identificación humana nos permite disfrutar del estado visceral de las esculturas, y de las referencias de ciencia ficción y cultura pop que suelen influir en su obra junto a las antiguas. Mantener esta tensión es el fuerte sentido de la mano de Bhabha: sus técnicas de moldeado, perfilado, pellizco y raspado por medio de las cuales trabaja los objetos se ven reflejadas en los numerosos rastros de manipulación física que marcan sus superficies. El barro oaxaqueño local que utilizó para su obra es un material denso, típicamente empleado para la fabricación de ladrillos. Sus compuestos minerales -arena y sedimentos- cambian durante la cocción para producir algo bruto y a la vez sofisticado. Los colores pasan de un marrón rojizo a un rosado polvoriento, mientras que las texturas van desde papel de lija grueso hasta disolución de sal marina. Estas obras sin esmaltar fueron elaboradas en un horno de ladrillos tradicional frente a la playa, calentado con combustión lenta de leña y coco por hasta doce horas. La distribución desigual del calor produjo diferentes efectos entre las obras, pero todas ellas se encuentran impregnadas de una sensación de conexión con la tierra. Sentimos la transformación del material orgánico: lo que una vez fue barro flexible está ahora rígidamente solidificada en un reposo eterno. 

Text-Image

Huma Bhabha
Huma Bhabha
Huma Bhabha
Huma Bhabha

Huma Bhabha

Sentinel, 2022

terracotta

78 3/4 x 9 x 9 inches

(200 x 22.9 x 22.9 cm)

Fundación Casa Wabi Collection / Donation by the artist

Accompanying the gallery installation, Bhabha has created an outdoor work for the Casa Wabi sculpture garden. Made with the same Oaxacan clay, it echoes the slender vertical form of a ubiquitous type of local cactus, surmounted by a head to create a figure. Bhabha’s Sentinel stands guard, a benign and watchful creative spirit.

Además de la instalación de la galería, Bhabha ha creado una obra al aire libre para el jardín de esculturas de Casa Wabi. Elaborada con el mismo barro oaxaqueño, dicha obra hace eco de la esbelta forma vertical de un tipo ubicuo de cactus local, coronada con una cabeza para formar una figura. La escultura Sentinel de Bhabha hace guardia, un espíritu creativo, benigno y vigilante.


Nicholas Baume is Artistic & Executive Director of Public Art Fund
Nicholas Baume es Director Ejecutivo y Artístico del Public Art Fund
 

Spanish translation provided by The Translation House

Huma Bhabha has been the subject of solo exhibitions at institutions including BALTIC Centre for Contemporary Art, Gateshead, England (2020); Institute of Contemporary Art, Boston (2019); The Contemporary Austin, Texas (2018); We Come In Peace, Roof Garden Commission, Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York (2018); David Roberts Art Foundation (2017); MoMA PS1, Long Island City, New York (2012); Collezione Maramotti, Reggio Emilia, Italy (2012); and Aspen Art Museum, Aspen, Colorado (2011). Notable group exhibitions include NIRIN, the 22nd Biennale of Sydney (2020); Yorkshire Sculpture International, Leeds and Wakefield, England (2019); Carnegie International, 57th Edition, Carnegie Museum of Art, Pittsburgh (2018); and All the World’s Futures, 56th Venice Biennale, Italy (2015). Bhabha’s work is in the permanent collections of the Centre Pompidou, Paris; Los Angeles County Museum of Art; Museum of Modern Art, New York; Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; and Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Washington, D.C., where her monumental work We Come in Peace (2018) is on view in the museum’s sculpture garden. Bhabha lives and works in Poughkeepsie, New York.

To learn more about Huma Bhabha, please view these articles from Vogue Hong KongT Magazine, ArtReview, ELLE, and The New York Times, or purchase catalogues from her exhibitions here.

Photography by Diego Berruecos
Photograph of Huma Bhabha in-process courtesy of Fundación Casa Wabi

Thank you to the team at Fundación Casa Wabi, for their generous collaboration and assistance:

Bosco Sodi | Founder
Carla Sodi |  General director
Alberto Ríos de la Rosa | Chief curator
Gustavo Gutierrez |  Administrator
Tania Tagle |  Special projects director
Juan Pino |  Community projects director
Gustavo Parra |  Sustainability and pavilions director 
Natalia Gómez  | Artist liaison
Natanael Ramirez Salinas | Clay and film programs manager 

Every effort has been made to reach the copyright holders and obtain permission to reproduce the above material. Please get in touch with any inquiries or any information relating to unattributed content.