Printed Matter's Virtual Art Book Fair

Printed Matter's Virtual Art Book Fair

DavidKordanskyGallery.PMVABF.org

Through February 28, 2021

David Kordansky Gallery is pleased to participate in Printed Matter’s Virtual Art Book Fair (PMVABF), now open through Sunday, February 28. To browse our booth at PMVABF, please click here.

Shop now to purchase exclusive signed copies of Lauren Halsey: Mohn Award 2018, the monograph published on the occasion of the Hammer Museum’s Made in L.A. 2018 biennial exhibition, and Untitled (mask), a signed and numbered limited edition print and monograph by Adam Pendleton.

Also available are signed books by Huma Bhabha, Sam Gilliam, Jennifer Guidi, Calvin Marcus, Mary Weatherford, Jonas Wood, and more, as well as a selection of new and recent multi-artist catalogues including Black Futures by Kimberly Drew and Jenna Wortham and the Phaidon titles Grief and Grievance: Art and Mourning in America and Vitamin D3: Today's Best in Contemporary Drawing.

IN CONVERSATION: Jason Fox and Naomi Fry

IN CONVERSATION: Jason Fox and Naomi Fry

Virtual Talk

On Thursday, March 4, join us for a virtual talk with Jason Fox and The New Yorker staff writer, Naomi Fry at 11 AM PT / 2 PM ET. Please click here to register for the event. 

Fox and Fry will take a closer look at the themes explored in the artist’s presentation with FIAC (Foire Internationale D'Art Contemporain). This new body of work includes a series of paintings and works on paper made during the pandemic that focuses extensively on painterly depictions of heads and busts and which fuse together figures such as Joni Mitchell and Barack Obama with Fox’s recurring motifs of dragons and his dog.

Fred Eversley

Fred Eversley

David Kordansky Gallery

March 20 – May 1, 2021

Recent Sculpture features the first new work Fred Eversley made over the last two years in New York, where he has been living and working after leaving the Venice, California studio he had previously occupied for five decades. The exhibition includes constellations of unique Parabolic Lenses and a group of rare horizontal lenses whose subtleties of pooled color provide a dynamic evolution of Eversley’s vocabulary and a different physical perspective by which to experience his concerns with energy. Taken together, the works in the show find Eversley exploring new chromatic relationships and the broadest spectrum of transparency and luminosity.

A key member of the group of artists associated with West Coast Light and Space, Eversley spent his formative years as an engineer in the aerospace industry before developing a series of processes and specialized tools that enabled him to produce the first of his iconic Parabolic Lens sculptures in the late 1960s. The lenses, which Eversley continues to refine and elaborate today, constitute a sustained body of research and investigation that has few equals in the postwar era. As visual and metaphysical focal points, they are immersive and enigmatic objects that are focused in presentation but cosmic in scope. Eversley’s ability to harness the naturally occurring energies brought into relation by the parabola results in effects of light and color that are responsive to a multitude of real-time factors: the ambient conditions of the viewing space; the position of the viewer’s body; and the psychological qualities and philosophical considerations that are inseparable from perception itself.

Lucy Bull

Lucy Bull

David Kordansky Gallery

March 20 – May 1, 2021

Skunk Grove, an exhibition of new paintings by Lucy Bull, is the artist’s first show at David Kordansky Gallery.

Bull’s paintings are visceral works that appeal directly to the senses. Synesthetic fields of shape and color, her paintings are described in sonic, tactile, or even emotional terms that evade rational logic and are distinctive to each viewer. This tension between the paintings’ bracing, unexpected materiality and the subjective responses it elicits engenders something akin to transformation: as their formal attributes function as visual bait, the eye is drawn into the atmospheric spaces of each composition before encountering a seemingly limitless number of associative openings. Worlds take shape across their varied surfaces and just as quickly fall away again; similarly, just when the act of looking generates optical overload or disruptive dissonance, Bull’s accumulations of marks reveal discernible traces of planning and hard-fought negotiations with her materials, leading the viewer back toward the concrete realities of pigment, medium, and surface.

The gestures that animate the works in Skunk Grove gravitate toward several overlapping categories. They include daubed, gauzy veils; illusionistic swirls and stratifications; and networks of scratched marks that give way to underlying areas of paint. When followed from one work to the next, these serve as guides into the unknown territories that crystallize on the canvas.

Tom of Finland

Tom of Finland

David Kordansky Gallery

March 20 – May 1, 2021

Tom of Finland: Pen and Ink 1965 – 1989 is an exhibition of finished and preparatory drawings made by the artist in a range of media, including pencil, pen, ink, marker, and gouache. Together, these pictures demonstrate the breadth of graphic production key to Tom of Finland’s creative output throughout his lifetime. The exhibition is curated in close collaboration with Tom of Finland Foundation, Los Angeles.

Tom of Finland (Touko Laaksonen, Finnish; b. May 8, 1920, d. November 7, 1991) has long been recognized as one of the 20th century’s great visual innovators. A masterful draftsman, Tom produced an expressive body of work that depicts masculine, empowered gay men fully enjoying their sexuality, engulfed in intimate moments of unabashed joy and pleasure. This exhibition showcases the artist’s diverse material approaches to his meticulous figurations—including sharp pen and marker linework, ink washes, as well as delicate pencil shading—that exemplify the boldness of his vision and the virtuoso qualities of his hand. With their skillful observation of light and classical composition, and their images of muscular men engaged in complex motions, the drawings reveal formal concerns that call to mind the work of Caravaggio and Rembrandt.

Tom made many of the works featured in Tom of Finland: Pen and Ink 1965 – 1989 with pen, ink, and marker for the purpose of reproduction in publications. In turn, the printed medium provided a space for Tom to produce and disseminate his fantasies in the fullest possible capacity, giving legendary form to an imaginative universe that helped fuel real-world liberation movements and enabled gay men to have agency over their sexuality in new ways.

Ruby Neri: Outside

Ruby Neri: Outside

Online Viewing Room

February 12 – March 2, 2021

Ruby Neri: Outside, an online solo exhibition that documents and coincides with the installation of recent ceramic sculptures by the Los Angeles-based artist in the gallery’s new outdoor courtyard, is now live at DavidKordanskyGallery.com through March 2, 2021.

To access Ruby Neri: Outside, please click here.

The three works on view in Ruby Neri: Outside vary in size and composition, and they also propose three distinct relationships with the traditional vessel. In the case of the largest work, Untitled (2019), the only thing that might be said to function as a vessel in the usual sense is the pedestal-like form on which the life-sized figure appears to sit or lay. Neri has glazed this lower portion of the sculpture so that its 360-degree scene alludes directly to landscape: bucolic white flowers crop up from a yellow-green field and encircle a supine woman who might be seen as sleeping if not for her open eyes, which stare back at the viewer with a mixture of shock and curiosity. But it is the three-dimensional tableau of the work’s upper half that dominates its composition and contains its greatest surprises. As a sculptural statement, it is marked by bravado and action; as a representation of the complexities of motherhood, it is perhaps even more far-reaching.

Derek Fordjour Represented by David Kordansky Gallery

Derek Fordjour Represented by David Kordansky Gallery

David Kordansky Gallery is honored to welcome Derek Fordjour to the gallery. Fordjour makes paintings, sculptures, and installations whose exuberant visual materiality gives rise to portraits and other multilayered compositions. Born of both broad sociological vision and a keen awareness of the body’s vulnerability, Fordjour’s tableaux are filled with athletes, performers, and others who play key roles in cultural rituals and communal rites of passage. In his paintings, Fordjour methodically constructs the ground of each composition through a collage-based process involving cardboard, newspaper, and other materials and pigments. The varied and textural surfaces that emerge are as complex—and physically engaging—as the dynamic subjects that Fordjour inscribes on top, within, and through them. His ability to grapple with many strata of artmaking on physical, conceptual, and straightforwardly human terms alike allows his project to communicate the widest possible array of emotions, from celebration and ecstasy to melancholy and lamentation. This, in turn, allows Fordjour to connect to audiences inside and outside of traditional art venues.

A major, new painting by Fordjour will be the subject of an upcoming One-on-One online exhibition at DavidKordanskyGallery.com in April 2021. A solo exhibition at David Kordansky Gallery will follow in spring 2022.

In 2020, Derek Fordjour (b. 1974, Memphis, Tennessee) was the subject of a solo exhibition at the Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis. In 2018, commissions for the Whitney Museum of American Art Billboard Project and the Metropolitan Transit Authority Arts & Design program resulted in significant public projects in New York. Recent group exhibitions include 100 Drawings from Now, The Drawing Center, New York (2020); Plumb Line, California African American Museum, Los Angeles (2019); and Reclamation!, Taubman Museum of Art, Roanoke, Virginia (2019). His work is in the public collections of institutions including the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago; Dallas Museum of Art; Pérez Art Museum Miami; Nasher Museum of Art at Duke University, Durham, North Carolina; Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; and The Studio Museum in Harlem, New York. Fordjour was the Spring 2020 Alex Katz Chair in Painting at The Cooper Union, New York, and currently serves as a Core Critic at the Yale School of Art, New Haven, Connecticut. He lives and works in New York.

Richard Tuttle

Richard Tuttle

David Kordansky Gallery

January 23 – March 6, 2021

David Kordansky Gallery is pleased to announce Nine Stepping Stones, Richard Tuttle’s first exhibition at the gallery, and the first major presentation of the artist's work in Los Angeles in nearly fifteen years.


Featuring a new group of wall-based works, this exhibition highlights the recent production of one of the most representative American artists of the postwar period. Over the past six decades, Tuttle has occupied interstitial positions between several genres, including painting, sculpture, drawing, and poetry. In each case, his work demonstrates how traditional categories of artmaking can function as starting points for wide-ranging investigations into the functioning of perception and language, questioning not only how we see or experience, but also what is being seen or experienced. Such questions ultimately hinge upon how a person—whether artist or viewer or both—inhabits and makes sense of the thing that comes to be known as an artwork. Nine Stepping Stones is dedicated to a series of assemblages whose titles all include the word "head" and whose roughly head-like proportions and shapes symbolize the human (and humanistic) frame of reference through which they can be engaged. Built from plywood that in turn becomes a support for spray-painted marks, each is a lyrical conundrum defined by its mysteries of construction and palpable sense of aesthetic openness exercised within clear (if elusive) limits and expressed via humble materials. In these works, color is nominal and painting is diffracted, revealing a spectrum of constituent parts that goes beyond the visual and pushes the medium into uncharted territory. As has been the case throughout his career, Tuttle achieves visual and conceptual strength not by overpowering viewers or the spaces they inhabit, but by coaxing attention back to boundless acts of seeing, thinking, and feeling that are analogues for human freedom.

 

These lacustrine homes

These lacustrine homes

David Kordansky Gallery

January 23 – March 6, 2021

The group exhibition These lacustrine homes, curated by Mai-Thu Perret, features works by Valentin Carron, Isabelle Cornaro, Karin Gulbran, Matthew Lutz-Kinoy, and Perret herself.

 

The title of the exhibition takes inspiration from "These Lacustrine Cities," a poem by John Ashbery inspired by the geography of Switzerland and the social implications of living in proximity to large bodies of water. While the artists in this show hail from different locations, their objects favor an aqueous, amorphous quality that has been historically maligned as overly diffuse by the canon, but which represents a quasi-mystical drive for boundlessness in alternative cultural contexts. Exploring the tension between domestic materiality on one hand and a biomorphic, dream-like strangeness on the other becomes a way for them to consider the intrinsic life force of the art object from a vantage point defined by a kind of covert conceptualism. In a new animation, for instance, Isabelle Cornaro develops metaphors for unbridled consumption that are as humorous as they are horrific. Matthew Lutz-Kinoy’s large-scale depiction of leisure as romantic resistance, meanwhile, pictures nude Lake Geneva bathers embracing and conjures the fin-de-siècle symbolism of Swiss painter Ferdinand Hodler. Valentin Carron’s cast aluminum bathrobes connote the presence of the body precisely by its absence and perform a "dry" reading of the body’s abiding "wetness." Perret’s own ceramic sculptures test the limits of that medium’s mutability in physical and formal terms alike, and the vessels of Karin Gulbran—which take on traditional as well as surreal, animal-like shapes—exude an ensouled warmth that speaks to the transcendental tactility of the natural world. Taken together, the works on view in These lacustrine homes exist at the intersection of the symbolism and the visceral materiality inherent to artmaking.

Joel Mesler

Joel Mesler

David Kordansky Gallery

January 23 – March 6, 2021

Surrender, an exhibition of new paintings and works on paper by Joel Mesler, is the artist’s first show at the gallery.

In Mesler’s work, childhood memories and traumas fuel meditations on class, design, and popular iconography, as well as explorations of the liquid, fluid, and mutable nature of the painting process. Surrender finds the artist exploring the power of acceptance, allowing emotions—and the physical and cultural forms in which they become constellated—to exist at the center of his project. Mesler’s new canvases are sharply tuned juxtapositions of language and image in which resonant phrases like "Mom" and "Don’t Cry" are rendered in text that is itself a graphic construction, written in letters made to resemble fire, milk, cocaine, or a Mercedes-Benz hood ornament. The backgrounds against which these phrases appear are also suffused with autobiographical import, evoking key moments from the artist’s past. Mesler reproduces a 1980s Marimekko rainbow pattern, for instance, to channel both youthful wonder and over-determined menace; as the words "Hopes and Dreams" go up in flames atop it, he evokes a happy-sad reckoning with lost innocence. And in his new works on paper, each of which has been executed on a David Kordansky Gallery exhibition poster from the early 2000s, Mesler directly addresses his journey as both an artist and an art dealer, as well as his formative years in Los Angeles and the trials and triumphs that have made the last two decades an unlikely story of personal and professional homecoming.

Tobias Pils Represented by David Kordansky Gallery

Tobias Pils Represented by David Kordansky Gallery

David Kordansky Gallery is pleased to announce its representation of Tobias Pils. Working within a palette of blacks and whites and the range of grays that can be made from them, Pils creates mixed-media paintings full of abstract and representational elements. These elements are often arranged so that they flow from one to the next seemingly of their own accord, obeying the dictates of a painterly logic that generates meaning through the accumulation of many small moments. As such, his works are endlessly captivating as arrangements of textures, flows, and material invention—in a sense, as symphonic, non-objective compositions, even when their mythological content and primal imagery tempt narrative readings. This syncretic approach reflects a mind that revels in contradictions, even as it seeks to suture together contrasting passages with a subtle and virtuosic array of mark-making strategies that are alternately bold, incisive, impressionistic, and completely open to the innate properties of paint medium and support. Pils works at a variety of scales and in different contexts, responding to the urgency of his own intuition and the external constraints of architectural and institutional settings with equal fluency. In each of these forums, he locates the places where the vast and the intimate meet, both in the physical world and the human psyche alike.

 

Balancing, a new painting by Tobias Pils, will be the subject of the gallery's next One-on-One online exhibition in January 2021. His first solo exhibition at David Kordansky Gallery will open in November 2021. New work by Pils is featured in the gallery's Art Basel OVR: Miami Beach presentation, on view at DavidKordanskyGallery.com through December 6, 2020. 

 

In 2020, a permanent, large-scale installation of paintings by Tobias Pils (b. 1971, Linz, Austria) was inaugurated at Kunstmuseum Bonn, Germany, and a major permanent fresco was installed at the Renzo Piano-designed campus of École normale supérieure Paris-Saclay, Gif-sur-Yvette, France. He has been the subject of solo exhibitions at the Josef Albers Museum, Bottrop, Germany (2017); Le Consortium, Dijon, France (with Michael Williams, 2017); Chinati Foundation, Marfa, Texas (2016); and Secession, Vienna (2013), among other institutions. Recent group shows include Picasso et la bande dessinée, Musée Picasso, Paris (2020), Jay DeFeo – The Ripple Effect, Aspen Art Museum, Colorado (2018); Le Consortium Collection, Le Consortium, Dijon, France (2018); and Spiegelnde Fenster, 21er Haus, Vienna (2017). His work is part of the permanent collections of Albertina, Vienna; Kunstmuseum Bonn, Germany; and Le Consortium, Dijon, France, among other institutions. Pils lives and works in Vienna.

Deana Lawson Awarded the 2020 Hugo Boss Prize

Deana Lawson Awarded the 2020 Hugo Boss Prize

Congratulations to Deana Lawson, who has won the 2020 Hugo Boss Prize. The biennial prize, established in 1996 and administered by the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation, honors outstanding achievement in contemporary art, celebrating the work of remarkable artists whose practices are among the most innovative and influential of our time. Lawson is the first artist working in photography to be recognized with the award. She will present a solo exhibition at the Guggenheim Museum in New York in Spring 2021.

The 2020 Hugo Boss Prize jury is comprised of Naomi Beckwith, Manilow Senior Curator, Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago; Katherine Brinson, Daskalopoulos Curator, Contemporary Art, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum; Julieta González, independent curator; Christopher Y. Lew, Nancy and Fred Poses Curator, Whitney Museum of American Art; and Nat Trotman, Curator, Performance and Media, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum.

Richard Tuttle Represented by David Kordansky Gallery

Richard Tuttle Represented by David Kordansky Gallery

David Kordansky Gallery is pleased to announce its West Coast representation of Richard Tuttle. Over the last six decades, Tuttle has become one of the most representative American artists of the postwar period, occupying interstitial positions between several genres, including painting, sculpture, drawing, and poetry. He consistently opens new possibilities for a variety of mediums and materials, demonstrating how traditional categories of artmaking can function as starting points for unhindered, open investigations into the functioning of perception and language. His early encounters with artists and artworks associated with pop and minimalism laid the groundwork for a project precipitated on reinvention and change. As Tuttle developed a syntax remarkable for the frankness of its physicality and the poetry of its juxtapositions, he created a space in which a decidedly avant-garde strain of contemporary art could take on the organic sophistication and subtlety of the natural world. At the same time, he began to produce a number of iconic typologies—including stretched and pinned canvases, painted reliefs, and works on paper—in which divisions between object, image, making, abstraction, and observation fell away, leaving in their wake a mode of translating the multiplicity and complexity of life into discrete, often elegant constructions notable for their precision, radical informality, and immediately tangible intimacy. David Kordansky Gallery co-represents Richard Tuttle on the West Coast in collaboration with Pace Gallery.

Tuttle's first solo exhibition with David Kordansky Gallery will open in Spring 2021. A new work will debut in the gallery's Art Basel OVR: Miami Beach presentation, December 2 – 6, 2020.

Since the 1970s, Richard Tuttle (b. 1941, Rahway, New Jersey) has been the subject of numerous solo exhibitions at museums throughout the world, including most recently M Woods Museum, Beijing (2019); Phillips Collection, Washington, D.C. (2018); Kunstmuseum aan Zee, Ostend, Belgium (2017); Museo de Arte de Lima (2016); Metropolitan Museum of Art (2016); and Whitechapel Gallery and Tate Modern, London (2014). In 2005–2006, a retrospective exhibition organized by the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art traveled to five additional institutions, including the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York and the Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles. His work is included in over sixty public collections, including those of the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York; Museum of Modern Art, New York; Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam; Dallas Museum of Art; and Museum Boijmans Van Beuningen, Rotterdam. Tuttle lives and works in New York and Abiquiú, New Mexico.

Our new gallery expansion is now open

Our new gallery expansion is now open

David Kordansky Gallery's new gallery expansion is now open. We're excited to share with you our new exhibition space and courtyard, which together form an integrated arts compound for a range of programming including outdoor sculpture, film, and performance. Timed reservations are required. Please click here to make an in-person appointment.

Developed by Kulapat Yantrasast and wHY, the expansion adds 12,800 square feet to our existing Mid-City, Los Angeles location, originally designed by wHY in 2014. The centerpiece is a skylit 2,000-square-foot exhibition space, which is divided into two contiguous volumes. Featuring chapel-like coved ceilings and proportioned to encourage a sense of intimacy, the space is designed for focused viewing.

In this spirit, we are pleased to present our first show with Linda Stark as the expansion's inaugural exhibition. Titled Hearts, the exhibition of paintings and works on paper opens today and will remain on view through October 24, 2020. Concurrently, an exhibition of new paintings by Lesley Vance, A Zebra Races Counterclockwise, is on view in our adjacent, original gallery, also through October 24, 2020.

New outdoor sculptures, Rashid Johnson's High Time and Will Boone's The Three Fates, are now installed in the courtyard, providing visual counterpoints to the surrounding landscape of drought-resistant plants and vines. The courtyard is accessed via a flowing, terraced exterior corridor, which leads visitors seamlessly between the original gallery and the expansion—and connects the unique spaces of the site together as a campus-like whole.

We look forward to seeing you at the expanded David Kordansky Gallery!

David Altmejd Represented by David Kordansky Gallery

David Altmejd Represented by David Kordansky Gallery

David Kordansky Gallery is pleased to announce its representation of David Altmejd. The gallery will present an online exhibition focused on a new sculpture by the Canadian-born, Los Angeles-based artist beginning this coming Wednesday, August 26, 8:00 am Pacific Time. The presentation will be on view at DavidKordanskyGallery.com through September 16, 2020.

 

David Altmejd explores the constitution and disintegration of the self, producing sculptures that expand the range of figurative representation, and conjuring abstract regions beyond the realm of recognizability. His work is centered on the human form, which in Altmejd’s vision includes not only the body but the mind, the imagination, and the soul, not to mention the ways the material world is perceived and felt through these channels. To this end, each of his works arises from an ongoing intuitive relationship with the large array of materials with which they are built, including clay, foam, mirror, quartz, resin, and both synthetic and human hair. Traditional processes like casting exist alongside idiosyncratic forms of bricolage; no two sculptures are alike, even when they seem to address related subjects. Altmejd approaches scale as a relative quantity, and over the course of his two-decade career he has treated room-sized installations and intimate busts with the same levels of intensity and commitment. Cosmological in scope, his work reveals a world-making ethos across its surfaces and in its details, where countless moments of invention and curiosity reflect ever-unfolding mysteries of consciousness.

 

David Altmejd (b. 1974, Montreal) has been the subject of solo exhibitions at Musées royaux des Beaux-Arts de Belgique, Brussels (2016); Kunsthal KAdE, Amersfoort, Netherlands (2016); Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, Humlebaek, Denmark (2015, traveled to Musée national des beaux-arts du Québec); Musée d’Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris (2014, traveled to Musée d’Art Contemporain de Montréal and Mudam Luxembourg – Musée d’Art Moderne Grand-Duc Jean); MOCA Cleveland (2012); and Brant Foundation Art Study Center, Greenwich, Connecticut (2011), among other institutions. In 2007, Altmejd represented Canada at the 52nd International Art Exhibition, La Biennale di Venezia, Venice. Recent group exhibitions include In the Spotlight of the Night Life in the Gloom, Marta Herford Museum, Herford, Germany (2019); Zombies: Pay Attention!, Aspen Art Museum, Colorado (2018); ANIMA MUNDI, Museum Boijmans Van Beuningen, Rotterdam (2018); Voyage d'hiver, Château de Versailles, France (2017); and A Material Legacy: The Nancy A. Nasher and David J. Haemisegger Collection of Contemporary Art, Nasher Museum of Art at Duke University, Durham, North Carolina (2016). His work is in the permanent collections of museums such as the Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles; Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York; Art Gallery of Ontario, Toronto; and Musée d'Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris. Altmejd lives and works in Los Angeles.

Deana Lawson Represented by David Kordansky Gallery

Deana Lawson Represented by David Kordansky Gallery

David Kordansky Gallery is pleased to announce its representation of Deana Lawson. Lawson makes photographs that explore the black familiar and its relationship to lore, global histories, and mystery traditions. She transforms observational picture-making into a powerful mode of expression, critique, and celebration. Romance and intimacy between subjects, as well as ritual and spirituality, appear throughout Lawson’s work, often within the same image. Her photographs emphasize formal approaches to film commonly associated with both Western and African 20th-century portraiture practices, in addition to appropriation and uses of vernacular imagery. Lawson engages her subjects with intention and intuition alike, in staged situations characterized by the piercing directness of the model’s gaze. With their meticulous mise-en-scènes filled with personal artifacts and decor, these portraits underscore the psychological connections between people and their domestic spaces, fusing biography, symbolism, and cultural observation, and creating expansive images of contemporary personhood.

 

David Kordansky Gallery will present work by Deana Lawson at the upcoming Art Basel Online Viewing Rooms, June 17 – 26, with a VIP preview June 17 – 19, 2020. 

Jason Fox Represented by David Kordansky Gallery

Jason Fox Represented by David Kordansky Gallery

David Kordansky Gallery is pleased to announce its representation of Jason Fox. For almost thirty years, Fox has painted pictures that inhabit the charged psychological spaces within American culture, as well as within the medium of painting itself. Exhibiting frequently at Feature Inc., among other galleries in the 1990s, he moved against the grain of prevailing appropriation-based and conceptual methodologies. His idiosyncratic, risk-taking paintings then and since have been filled with imaginary beings informed by modernist art, autobiographical reflection, and mythological symbolism, and a recurring cast of characters from comics, fantasy cinema, and popular music. As such, Fox produces pictures that condense broad propensities in the collective imagination into intimate images whose every brushstroke and color choice carries emotional weight. These unlikely but arresting pictures—suffused with Dadaist humor—make the most of painting’s ability to register organic, intuitively rendered changes in form and perspective. In many works from the last few years, Fox fuses portraits of well-known figures as well as images of his dog, demons, and angels. These hybridized beings appear to morph before the viewer’s eyes, communicating a sense of the fluidity with which they take shape on the canvas. This makes his work as personal and introspective as it is accessible, immediately recognizable, and culturally resonant.

 

An exhibition of Jason Fox's new paintings is currently on view at David Kordansky Gallery through July 11, 2020. The gallery will present work by Fox at the upcoming Art Basel Online Viewing Rooms, June 17 – 26, with a VIP preview June 17 – 19. 

Sam Gilliam

Sam Gilliam

Dia:Beacon

August 10, 2019 – Ongoing

A long-term installation of Sam Gilliam's early works from the 1960s and 1970s opens at Dia:Beacon, New York on Saturday, August 10.