Our new gallery expansion is now open

Our new gallery expansion is now open

David Kordansky Gallery's new gallery expansion is now open. We're excited to share with you our new exhibition space and courtyard, which together form an integrated arts compound for a range of programming including outdoor sculpture, film, and performance. Timed reservations are required. Please click here to make an in-person appointment.

Developed by Kulapat Yantrasast and wHY, the expansion adds 12,800 square feet to our existing Mid-City, Los Angeles location, originally designed by wHY in 2014. The centerpiece is a skylit 2,000-square-foot exhibition space, which is divided into two contiguous volumes. Featuring chapel-like coved ceilings and proportioned to encourage a sense of intimacy, the space is designed for focused viewing.

In this spirit, we are pleased to present our first show with Linda Stark as the expansion's inaugural exhibition. Titled Hearts, the exhibition of paintings and works on paper opens today and will remain on view through October 24, 2020. Concurrently, an exhibition of new paintings by Lesley Vance, A Zebra Races Counterclockwise, is on view in our adjacent, original gallery, also through October 24, 2020.

New outdoor sculptures, Rashid Johnson's High Time and Will Boone's The Three Fates, are now installed in the courtyard, providing visual counterpoints to the surrounding landscape of drought-resistant plants and vines. The courtyard is accessed via a flowing, terraced exterior corridor, which leads visitors seamlessly between the original gallery and the expansion—and connects the unique spaces of the site together as a campus-like whole.

We look forward to seeing you at the expanded David Kordansky Gallery!

Sam Gilliam

Sam Gilliam

Art Basel OVR:2020

September 23 – 26, 2020

David Kordansky Gallery is pleased to present a solo presentation of new works on paper by Sam Gilliam at Art Basel OVR:2020. The presentation opens this coming Wednesday, September 23, 3:00 am PT / 12:00 pm CET at ArtBasel.com and will remain on view through September 26, 2020. Gilliam’s newest watercolor paintings, among his largest pictures on paper to date, are a commanding statement in the ongoing development of a defining postwar American art practice, and a testament to Gilliam's career-long engagement with diverse supports and water-based pigments.

Sam Gilliam: Works on Paper at Art Basel OVR:2020 exemplifies the same energy and many of the same formal effects that he has achieved in his paintings in other formats. These new examples—produced using watercolors on handmade washi paper—are complex, lyrical, and moody, conjuring vistas of the natural world and the principles that define the movement and transformation of materials. Vibrant hues are overlaid with shimmering metallics; extremes of light and dark are juxtaposed in close proximity, creating surprising moments of chiaroscuro; and vein-like arrangements of great delicacy are organized into overarching passages notable for their graphic power. Throughout, Gilliam emerges as a virtuoso conductor, able to coax his materials into arresting compositions without sacrificing their inherent mutability and force. These paintings on paper reveal his range and ambition and help cement his status as one of the greatest living proponents of the power of abstraction. 

One-on-One: Sam Gilliam

One-on-One: Sam Gilliam

Online Viewing Room

September 23 – 30, 2020

David Kordansky Gallery is pleased to present the online exhibition One-on-One: Sam Gilliam, Harmony, featuring a historical, never-before-exhibited Hard-edge composition by the artist. The presentation opens this coming Wednesday, September 23, 3:00 am PT / 12:00 pm CET at DavidKordanskyGallery.com and will remain on view through September 30, 2020.

 

One-on-One: Sam Gilliam, Harmony is the gallery's tenth in a series of online exhibitions dedicated to a single artwork. One-on-One presentations utilize enhanced editorial content to provide an in-depth look at artists' practices and specific objects in their oeuvres. These exhibitions include statements from the artists, art-historical and cultural references, sound and video media that enrich the experience of viewing the work, as well as suggestions for further exploration.

 

Painted in 1965 at a moment when American politics and culture were undergoing a series of radical shifts, but never exhibited before, Harmony provides a window into the creative energy and experimental spirit that has been present throughout every phase of Sam Gilliam’s artistic development. With its clear connection to the geometric vocabulary that predominated among painters in Washington, D.C. at the time, the composition also telegraphs other kinds of thinking and making. Chief among these is the improvisational openness of jazz, which Gilliam has often cited as an inspiration, and which was often in a state of dynamic transformation in the mid-1960s. As Gilliam has shown time and again throughout the decades, familiar genres provide the unexpected potential for innovation when approached not as ends in and of themselves, but as points of departure.

Linda Stark

Linda Stark

David Kordansky Gallery

September 19 – October 24, 2020

David Kordansky Gallery is pleased to open its new exhibition space with the gallery’s first show of new paintings and works on paper by Linda Stark. Titled Hearts, this inaugural exhibition will be on view September 19 through October 24, 2020. David Kordansky Gallery is currently open by appointment. Timed reservations and virtual visits are available here.

David Kordansky Gallery’s new exhibition space forms part of its expanded Edgewood Place location in Mid-City, Los Angeles. Designed by the architecture practice wHY, the 12,800-square-foot expansion adds an intimate, skylit 2,000 square feet of indoor exhibition space, as well as areas for storage and operations, all located around a landscaped courtyard built for a range of programming, including performance, film, and outdoor sculpture.

Over the course of three decades, Los Angeles-based Linda Stark has produced a body of painting in which material experimentation and concentrated symbolic energy go hand in hand. The work is visionary, open, and suffused with an unlikely combination of humor and pathos; at the same time, it represents one of the most sustained investigations of the mutable potential of paint—as both a physical medium and a site of rich cultural discourse—in contemporary art.

As the exhibition’s title suggests, the paintings in Hearts frequently address varied iconographies associated with this most resonant of forms. Hearts occupy the literal and figurative centers of human and animal life, but they also appear in a wide range of social and narrative contexts. Emphasizing the sculptural qualities of paint as much as its visual or color-based ones, Stark creates objects that reflect the multivalent potential of the heart as vessel and beacon, biological organ and mystical source. In so doing, she reveals a broad array of interests, notable for their historical depth and up-to-the-minute urgency alike.

The suffragette movement and the fight for women’s right to vote; the use of hearts in medals for military purposes; the transformational power of religious imagery; and the ability of a heart to transform another image, like a watering eye, into something richly metaphorical are a few of the thematic areas Stark explores in the show. But these are also highly personal paintings that arise as responses to inner experiences of mind and body. Often years in the making, they are meticulously planned and executed so that they engender intimacy, wonder, and surprise.

A work like Telltale Heart (2016), for instance, exemplifies Stark’s pitch-perfect ability to balance the "making" and "finding" tendencies that define divergent strands of contemporary artistic practice. By using a section of an Army surplus jacket as a support—the seller promised that it "had been to war and back"—she imports a pre-established camouflage pattern and a readymade history of use that expand the physical and conceptual fields upon and in which painting itself then occurs. The small, intricately rendered, upside-down heart at the center of the composition thereby gains in visual weight and poetic intensity, becoming a pulsing reminder of the vulnerability at stake in any conflict, armed or otherwise. 

Another, related composition that also makes use of non-traditional materials nonetheless results in a very different kind of painting. In Burr Heart II (2020), Stark employs the painted upside-down heart as a receptacle for burrs—the pricking parts of river reeds collected in her own backyard—dropped in random arrangements and affixed to the canvas using red paint. The dark background that surrounds the heart, reminiscent of a night sky or oceanic expanse, is also notable for its distinct, dimpled texture. Throughout a work like this, paint does more than merely depict, represent, or serve aesthetic functions. It is enlisted here as an adhesive, and takes on an alchemical role as a substance that joins unlike things in a unified field of embodied meaning, coaxing order out of chaos and unexpected harmonies out of even the more dissonant or foreboding aspects of the natural world.

Like her paintings, Stark’s drawings are the products of intense focus and a constant renewal of her relationship to her materials. To this end, she organizes her studio so that she can dedicate herself to one of these modes of production at a time, allowing either drawing or painting to fully occupy her attention. Nonetheless, subjects and formal experiments carry over from one medium to the other, and the works on paper included in Hearts provide a sense of the scope of Stark’s interests and passions. They also demonstrate how she gives her motifs the space to come into focus at their own pace. As she returns to them over the years, they reveal their emotional complexities and reverberations, gaining in mystery and becoming only more elusive as she hones them and explores their intricacies. Knowledge and familiarity are never taken for granted; rather, Stark keeps the unknown squarely at the center of her gaze.

Linda Stark (b. 1956, San Diego) was previously the subject of a MATRIX series solo show at the UC Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive (BAMPFA), Berkeley, California (2013). Recent and forthcoming group exhibitions include New Time: Art and Feminisms in the 21st Century, BAMPFA (2021); Painting: Now and Forever, Part III, Matthew Marks Gallery and Greene Naftali, New York (2018); Made in L.A. 2018, Hammer Museum, Los Angeles; and Forms of Identity: Women Artists in the 90s, Orange County Museum of Art, Newport Beach, California (2017). Her work is in the public collections of institutions that include the Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo; Hammer Museum, Los Angeles; Los Angeles County Museum of Art; and Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego. Stark lives and works in Los Angeles.

wHY’s new Los Angeles arts campus for David Kordansky Gallery

wHY’s new Los Angeles arts campus for David Kordansky Gallery

Wallpaper*

September 8, 2020

David Kordansky Gallery's new gallery expansion is featured in Wallpaper*: wHY’s new Los Angeles arts campus for David Kordansky Gallery by Carole Dixon. The article is online at Wallpaper.com.

Our expanded gallery opens on September 19 with our first exhibition by Linda Stark. Make a reservation to visit at DavidKordanskyGallery.com.

Lesley Vance

Lesley Vance

David Kordansky Gallery

September 12 – October 24, 2020

David Kordansky Gallery is pleased to present an exhibition of new paintings by Lesley Vance, A Zebra Races Counterclockwise. The show, which opens on September 12 and will be on view through October 24, 2020, takes place across two of the gallery’s exhibition spaces and features paintings that are Vance’s largest to date. David Kordansky Gallery is currently open by appointment. Timed reservations and virtual visits are available. Please visit DavidKordanskyGallery.com/Reservations for more information and to make a reservation.

 

Lesley Vance has honed an unmistakable visual language in which abstraction articulates its connections to realities both tangible and ephemeral. She has achieved this in numerous ways, emphasizing relationships between light and shadow, exploring different perceptions of space, and reckoning with the materiality of color. Her new exhibition’s title is taken from a line in Frank O’Hara’s Poetry, a poem that teases out connections between quickness, surprise, and desire, and that enacts, through its own slippery syntax, the ways in which the mind attempts to impart fixity to changing situations: "A zebra races counterclockwise. / All this I desire. To / deepen you by my quickness / and delight as if you were logical and proven..."

 

Several of Vance's most recent paintings are over six feet tall and therefore enter into dialogue with the body in wholly new ways. Like her works of the last few years, the underlying architecture of these paintings is based in freely flowing expressive gestures that she elaborates over time, transforming them into networks of lines, textures, and intercut volumes. Because of their increased scale, these marks communicate the sweep of an entire arm. Passages appear to speed up or slow down with newfound force. Furthermore, the vivid intensity of her palette creates fully immersive, intensely optical viewing experiences in which foregrounds and backgrounds constantly jostle for primacy. For all their formal power, though, these paintings are sensitive documents that record the action of intelligence and imagination as they intersect with sensate reality.

 

This reality includes the qualities of paint itself, especially at a larger scale. In Vance’s case, this means that color can convincingly communicate illusions of weight and depth, becoming the focus of the viewer’s awareness. The eye moves back and forth between two opposing modes of seeing: just as it begins to lose itself within surreal constructions of shapes, lines, and planes, it is confronted with the fact of the materials Vance uses to create them. The pristine nature of her surfaces only gain in seductiveness and complexity when seen in person, and they are revealed to be decidedly handmade, tactile things made from the movements of the artist's brush, arm, and hand.

 

Working alone and without assistants, Vance establishes levels of intimacy and close engagement that are immediately palpable regardless of the size of the canvas. In several of the works on view, layers of brushy transparency carry with them the energy of expressionist gestures, thereby disrupting the otherwise intact edges that distinguish one distinct shape or space from another so that the fluidity of paint assumes center stage. The ribbon-like forms that swerve across Vance’s canvases vary in density and composition, picking up or shedding hues as they go, momentarily pausing before slipping back into the thickets of color and luminosity from which they emerge.

 

Suffused with the feel of the physical world, Vance’s paintings are full of shifting moods and paradoxes that deepen in complexity the longer they are viewed. Attuned to ever-finer nuances of perception and physical presence, her work becomes both stranger and more naturalistic as it continues to unfurl.

Lesley Vance (b. 1977, Milwaukee, Wisconsin; lives and works in Los Angeles) has been the subject of exhibitions at the FLAG Art Foundation, New York (2012); Bowdoin College Museum of Art, Brunswick, Maine (2012); and The Huntington Library, Art Museum, and Botanical Gardens, San Marino, California (2012, with Ricky Swallow). Recent group exhibitions include Aftereffect: Georgia O'Keeffe and Contemporary Painting, Museum of Contemporary Art, Denver (2018); The Campaign for Art, San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (2016); Don’t Shoot the Painter. Paintings from UBS Art Collection, Galleria d’Arte Moderna, Milan (2015); Variations: Conversations in and Around Abstract Painting, Los Angeles County Museum of Art (2014); and Painter Painter, Walker Art Center, Minneapolis (2013). Her paintings are in the public collections of the Museum of Modern Art, New York; Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; Dallas Museum of Art; Hammer Museum, Los Angeles; and San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, among many others. A monograph documenting the last seven years of her work was recently published by Gregory R. Miller & Co.

One-on-One: David Altmejd

One-on-One: David Altmejd

Online Viewing Room

August 26 – September 23, 2020

David Kordansky Gallery presents One-on-One: David Altmejd, enter. The online exhibition features a new sculpture that expands upon previous ideas and serves as an engine for a host of new ones, illuminating a dynamic juncture in Altmejd's two-decade career. The presentation is now live at DavidKordanskyGallery.com and will remain on view through September 23, 2020.

 

With its multiple cast features, uncannily rendered surfaces, and refracted gaze, enter (2020) embodies the paradoxes that make Altmejd’s work such a compelling and vibrant feature of the contemporary landscape. Like many preceding works, the bust of a human figure is portrayed in a state of flux, emerging from its materials in a way that captures the energies of biological, geological, and perhaps even spiritual or metaphysical growth. At the same time, this growth leads to the disintegration of fixed identity, transforming the subject of the sculpture into a being that cannot be described as any one person or thing. Altmejd emphasizes this in-between status by intimately merging the ears of a rabbit—also multiplied—with the body of the bust, generating a hybrid of organs and species. Cradled in its hands, the rabbit acts as a kind of guide, leading us—and the artist—into mysteries of construction and consciousness. The sculpture opens spaces both within itself and within the minds of its viewers, and becomes a portal through which to encounter the past, present, and future of Altmejd’s visionary project.

 

To view the online exhibition, please click here.

David Altmejd Represented by David Kordansky Gallery

David Altmejd Represented by David Kordansky Gallery

David Kordansky Gallery is pleased to announce its representation of David Altmejd. The gallery will present an online exhibition focused on a new sculpture by the Canadian-born, Los Angeles-based artist beginning this coming Wednesday, August 26, 8:00 am Pacific Time. The presentation will be on view at DavidKordanskyGallery.com through September 16, 2020.

 

David Altmejd explores the constitution and disintegration of the self, producing sculptures that expand the range of figurative representation, and conjuring abstract regions beyond the realm of recognizability. His work is centered on the human form, which in Altmejd’s vision includes not only the body but the mind, the imagination, and the soul, not to mention the ways the material world is perceived and felt through these channels. To this end, each of his works arises from an ongoing intuitive relationship with the large array of materials with which they are built, including clay, foam, mirror, quartz, resin, and both synthetic and human hair. Traditional processes like casting exist alongside idiosyncratic forms of bricolage; no two sculptures are alike, even when they seem to address related subjects. Altmejd approaches scale as a relative quantity, and over the course of his two-decade career he has treated room-sized installations and intimate busts with the same levels of intensity and commitment. Cosmological in scope, his work reveals a world-making ethos across its surfaces and in its details, where countless moments of invention and curiosity reflect ever-unfolding mysteries of consciousness.

 

David Altmejd (b. 1974, Montreal) has been the subject of solo exhibitions at Musées royaux des Beaux-Arts de Belgique, Brussels (2016); Kunsthal KAdE, Amersfoort, Netherlands (2016); Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, Humlebaek, Denmark (2015, traveled to Musée national des beaux-arts du Québec); Musée d’Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris (2014, traveled to Musée d’Art Contemporain de Montréal and Mudam Luxembourg – Musée d’Art Moderne Grand-Duc Jean); MOCA Cleveland (2012); and Brant Foundation Art Study Center, Greenwich, Connecticut (2011), among other institutions. In 2007, Altmejd represented Canada at the 52nd International Art Exhibition, La Biennale di Venezia, Venice. Recent group exhibitions include In the Spotlight of the Night Life in the Gloom, Marta Herford Museum, Herford, Germany (2019); Zombies: Pay Attention!, Aspen Art Museum, Colorado (2018); ANIMA MUNDI, Museum Boijmans Van Beuningen, Rotterdam (2018); Voyage d'hiver, Château de Versailles, France (2017); and A Material Legacy: The Nancy A. Nasher and David J. Haemisegger Collection of Contemporary Art, Nasher Museum of Art at Duke University, Durham, North Carolina (2016). His work is in the permanent collections of museums such as the Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles; Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York; Art Gallery of Ontario, Toronto; and Musée d'Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris. Altmejd lives and works in Los Angeles.

Deana Lawson Represented by David Kordansky Gallery

Deana Lawson Represented by David Kordansky Gallery

David Kordansky Gallery is pleased to announce its representation of Deana Lawson. Lawson makes photographs that explore the black familiar and its relationship to lore, global histories, and mystery traditions. She transforms observational picture-making into a powerful mode of expression, critique, and celebration. Romance and intimacy between subjects, as well as ritual and spirituality, appear throughout Lawson’s work, often within the same image. Her photographs emphasize formal approaches to film commonly associated with both Western and African 20th-century portraiture practices, in addition to appropriation and uses of vernacular imagery. Lawson engages her subjects with intention and intuition alike, in staged situations characterized by the piercing directness of the model’s gaze. With their meticulous mise-en-scènes filled with personal artifacts and decor, these portraits underscore the psychological connections between people and their domestic spaces, fusing biography, symbolism, and cultural observation, and creating expansive images of contemporary personhood.

 

David Kordansky Gallery will present work by Deana Lawson at the upcoming Art Basel Online Viewing Rooms, June 17 – 26, with a VIP preview June 17 – 19, 2020. 

Jason Fox Represented by David Kordansky Gallery

Jason Fox Represented by David Kordansky Gallery

David Kordansky Gallery is pleased to announce its representation of Jason Fox. For almost thirty years, Fox has painted pictures that inhabit the charged psychological spaces within American culture, as well as within the medium of painting itself. Exhibiting frequently at Feature Inc., among other galleries in the 1990s, he moved against the grain of prevailing appropriation-based and conceptual methodologies. His idiosyncratic, risk-taking paintings then and since have been filled with imaginary beings informed by modernist art, autobiographical reflection, and mythological symbolism, and a recurring cast of characters from comics, fantasy cinema, and popular music. As such, Fox produces pictures that condense broad propensities in the collective imagination into intimate images whose every brushstroke and color choice carries emotional weight. These unlikely but arresting pictures—suffused with Dadaist humor—make the most of painting’s ability to register organic, intuitively rendered changes in form and perspective. In many works from the last few years, Fox fuses portraits of well-known figures as well as images of his dog, demons, and angels. These hybridized beings appear to morph before the viewer’s eyes, communicating a sense of the fluidity with which they take shape on the canvas. This makes his work as personal and introspective as it is accessible, immediately recognizable, and culturally resonant.

 

An exhibition of Jason Fox's new paintings is currently on view at David Kordansky Gallery through July 11, 2020. The gallery will present work by Fox at the upcoming Art Basel Online Viewing Rooms, June 17 – 26, with a VIP preview June 17 – 19. 

GalleryPlatform.LA

GalleryPlatform.LA

David Kordansky Gallery is proud to be participating in Gallery Platform LA, launching on May 15. For more information, please visit GalleryPlatform.LA.

Sixty Los Angeles art galleries have joined together to create an online platform to promote engagement with the local and international art audience. GalleryPlatform.LA will present twelve gallery “viewing rooms” each week, with each gallery appearing on the platform once every six weeks. The platform will also include an editorial section featuring video visits with Los Angeles artists, collectors, and gallerists.

The online gallery platform is the first project of what will become a Los Angeles Gallery Association, which will coordinate joint programming, gallery maps and itineraries, and other projects to enhance the art-viewing experience in Los Angeles.

Fore more information, please click here.

Sam Gilliam

Sam Gilliam

Dia:Beacon

August 10, 2019 – Ongoing

A long-term installation of Sam Gilliam's early works from the 1960s and 1970s opens at Dia:Beacon, New York on Saturday, August 10.